Army Basic Training Timeline at a Glance
2023/07/04

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Army Basic Training is a rigorous 10-week program that is divided into three phases: Red, White, and Blue. Each phase focuses on specific aspects of training to transform recruits into confident and disciplined soldiers.

During the Red Phase (Weeks 1-3), recruits undergo intense training to learn the fundamentals of soldiering and Army values. They participate in classroom sessions where they are introduced to the Army's core values, traditions, and ethics. Additionally, recruits receive instruction on assembling, disassembling, and caring for their M16 rifles. They also learn about security, crowd dispersion discipline, combatives (hand-to-hand combat), and guerrilla exercises.

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Physical fitness training, including running and tactical daylight marches, plays a significant role during this phase. Recruits are evaluated through the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) multiple times to monitor their progress.

In the White Phase (Weeks 4-5), known as the Rifleman or Gunfighter Phase, recruits focus on developing combat skills, marksmanship, and physical fitness. They undergo training in basic rifle marksmanship (BRM) and learn to engage targets at various distances and from different positions. Recruits practice zeroing their rifles and prioritizing multiple targets simultaneously.

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Hand-to-hand training, rappelling, barracks inspections, map reading, and continued study of Army values are also included in this phase. Night training and more fitness training further enhance their skills.

The Blue Phase (Weeks 6-9), also called the Warrior Phase, emphasizes individual tactical training, leadership development, self-discipline, and teamwork. In this phase, recruits advance their rifle marksmanship skills, maneuver and engage targets as part of a team, and learn convoy operations. They receive additional weapons training, including machine guns, grenade launchers, and mines.

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Combat tactics such as defeating improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and engaging in military operations in urban terrain (MOUT) are covered. Recruits participate in tactical foot marches of 10 and 15 kilometers and undergo a field training exercise on bivouac to integrate all their training. They also face the End of Cycle Test (EOCT), which consists of 212 tasks that must be passed, as well as the final Army Physical Fitness Test.

After completing the nine-week training, recruits enter Week 10, which culminates in the Army Basic Training Graduation. This week focuses on soldiers and their families.

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Recruits participate in final training events, including a one-week field training exercise and a 15-kilometer march back to the post. Following this, recruits receive a day with their families to share their experiences. The next day, they graduate from basic training before proceeding to the next phase of their military career, typically advanced individual training (AIT).

Army Basic Training provides recruits with the necessary skills, discipline, and teamwork to become successful soldiers. It is a challenging but rewarding journey that prepares individuals for their service in the United States Army.

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